vet darwin

Dr. Downes provides us with a brilliant account of how vet Darwin managed to put his ideas intopractice. His arguments against traditional methods are well phrased and his optimism about progress in the world of medicine is expressed in this narrative. It is a valuable tool to have in our schools to make students see how important it is to challenge prevailing ideas and paradigms in order to bettr humanity and advance the cause of evolution. I believe that Dr. Downes is the perfect choice as a teachng author in the field of vet medicine because his knowledge of the world of animals and his understanding of how we treat them will make the students more attentive and critical thinkers who will be better equipped to critiquing veterinarian ideas in the future.

Evolution and the Human Brain.

When reading Vets, Lawyers and the Revolution by Dr. John Darby, one must take note that it is Dr. Darby who is providing the historical insights to Dr. Lawrence Wilkins who is the critic would provide the intellectual response. In other words, both are contributors but Dr. Wilkins is much more intellectual while Dr. Darby is more of a descriptively trainer. So, this book on veterinary medicine in particular takes on the part of the veterinarian as the liberator of the animal kingdom by challenging the assumptions and social codes that govern our treatment of animals. The book portrays a Dr. Darwin, who is not very different from our modern-day veterinary scientists who do not hesitate to use the most scientific methods and technologies to arrive at reasonable solutions for the treatment of animals. The difference is that they would not stop there, they would go the next step, applying their rational and deductive method to solve the riddle.

As the story goes, Darwin’s expedition to India and his ensuing discussions and debates with the natives there provide the basis of his book while Wilkins presents a Deist point of view. The book portrays many facets of the dynamic relationship between man and nature and Darwin’s penetrating view of the world provided the moral foundation for the growth of science and of society itself. All in all, this is a very well written and researched book on a fascinating subject. One has to hand it to the author: whoever wrote this should be congratulated on an outstanding contribution to the world of sciences.